Minggu, 13 Maret 2011

Workhorse

Dremel 4000 3 34 120 Volt Variable

Dremel 4000 3 34 120 Volt Variable

Two examples of why Dremel is still the unquestionable leader in mini-rotary tools:

I recently bought a 4000-3/34 and I wanted to use the chuck I had been using on my old 395 instead of the collets. It didn't fit through the hole in the nosepiece of the 4000, so I took off the nosepiece and enlarged the hole. I wasn't satisfied with the 'quick-and-dirty' job I had done, so I contacted Dremel in Palm Desert in order to buy a replacement nosepiece. Without any questions they told me they'd send it right out to me at no charge as warranty service. When it arrive it was, unfortunately, the wrong part. Well, that's happened to me before, with other companies' tools, so even though they had been good enough to provide it for free (and the tool was working fine as it was) I decided to try again. And again, they told me they'd send a replacement at no cost with no questions or reluctance. Within a few days I had the right part, and I did a better job enlarging the hole (I subsequently discovered that the chuck they're selling now will fit the stock nosepiece).

The reason I had bought the 4000 is that my venerable 395 had broken down and I needed to finish a job without delay. When I opened up the 395 I discovered that there was a "flexible link" between the motor and the output shaft, and it had stripped. It was a short piece of flexible plastic tubing with internal splines to engage the metal shafts at both ends, and it was shredded inside. Initially I thought this was a regrettable design flaw, but I realized that it's just the weak link to prevent the user from damaging more expensive parts by challenging the tool too hard. Anyway, when I went to order the part, the woman who answered knew immediately what I was referring to and was able to complete my order efficiently. She even pointed out that, with the cost of the part being so small compared to the shipping (which was minor as well), I might consider ordering a second one. She encouraged me to leave the second one in the sealed package to prevent it from weakening from oxidation, and it would be ready to install if I should ever need it. Considering how old my 395 is, I'm not worried about that being any time soon. The parts arrived in a couple of days, and my 395 is back in action. And, considering how nice an upgrade the 4000 is, I don't mind having been forced to become the owner of two Dremels.

Dremel tools are well-designed and well-built, as long as the user works within the limits of their appropriate use (these are not industrial die-grinders). Craftsmanship is more a matter of patience and care than brute force. But any tool will require service at some point, if it's used a lot over the years, and that's where a manufacturer shows what they're really all about. With the kind of service I've received, I'd say it's no wonder that no other manufacturer has made much of a dent in the mini-rotary tool market. Dremel makes good products in the first place, and they back them up well. I'll never even consider buying a Dremel-like tool from anyone else!

Get your Dremel 4000 3 34 120 Volt Variable Now!

8 komentar:

  1. Two examples of why Dremel is still the unquestionable leader in mini-rotary tools:

    I recently bought a 4000-3/34 and I wanted to use the chuck I had been using on my old 395 instead of the collets. It didn't fit through the hole in the nosepiece of the 4000, so I took off the nosepiece and enlarged the hole. I wasn't satisfied with the 'quick-and-dirty' job I had done, so I contacted Dremel in Palm Desert in order to buy a replacement nosepiece. Without any questions they told me they'd send it right out to me at no charge as warranty service. When it arrive it was, unfortunately, the wrong part. Well, that's happened to me before, with other companies' tools, so even though they had been good enough to provide it for free (and the tool was working fine as it was) I decided to try again. And again, they told me they'd send a replacement at no cost with no questions or reluctance. Within a few days I had the right part, and I did a better job enlarging the hole (I subsequently discovered that the chuck they're selling now will fit the stock nosepiece).

    The reason I had bought the 4000 is that my venerable 395 had broken down and I needed to finish a job without delay. When I opened up the 395 I discovered that there was a "flexible link" between the motor and the output shaft, and it had stripped. It was a short piece of flexible plastic tubing with internal splines to engage the metal shafts at both ends, and it was shredded inside. Initially I thought this was a regrettable design flaw, but I realized that it's just the weak link to prevent the user from damaging more expensive parts by challenging the tool too hard. Anyway, when I went to order the part, the woman who answered knew immediately what I was referring to and was able to complete my order efficiently. She even pointed out that, with the cost of the part being so small compared to the shipping (which was minor as well), I might consider ordering a second one. She encouraged me to leave the second one in the sealed package to prevent it from weakening from oxidation, and it would be ready to install if I should ever need it. Considering how old my 395 is, I'm not worried about that being any time soon. The parts arrived in a couple of days, and my 395 is back in action. And, considering how nice an upgrade the 4000 is, I don't mind having been forced to become the owner of two Dremels.

    Dremel tools are well-designed and well-built, as long as the user works within the limits of their appropriate use (these are not industrial die-grinders). Craftsmanship is more a matter of patience and care than brute force. But any tool will require service at some point, if it's used a lot over the years, and that's where a manufacturer shows what they're really all about. With the kind of service I've received, I'd say it's no wonder that no other manufacturer has made much of a dent in the mini-rotary tool market. Dremel makes good products in the first place, and they back them up well. I'll never even consider buying a Dremel-like tool from anyone else!

    BalasHapus
  2. I have had two other Dremels that both finally wore out after years of hard abuse. the new one works great and I haven't found any negatives. I like the idea of the variable speed. The ones I had before were lower end with single speeds. I expect this one to last as long as my old ones if not longer.

    BalasHapus
  3. This is a big improvement over my Dad's old Dremel. I like several speeds (get the 4000). I like the box with the places to put all the different parts (including spaces for accessories that I may never buy but oh well...)

    BalasHapus
  4. This thing has so many uses, and is powerful and reliable. You might see some competitor's products at lower prices, but they just aren't worth it when you compare the power, versatility and reliability of the Dremel. The RPM range is quite large, and even the side handle is engineered smartly with a ventilation channel to allow for cooling. Case is very handy and has several slots for various items and attachments/bits. Even the cord snaps in to the case. You can put the tool away with most accessories on it and not worry about the case not closing.

    Also, for most accessories you don't need to mess with the little wrench to tighten them, there is the quick tool already installed on the dremel at all times, you just loosen it, and there's your tightening wrench :)

    BalasHapus
  5. Herman Preston21 Oktober 2012 05.32

    My last mission was replacing my 2003 Hummers catalytic converter. I tried an extension on the rachet set, only one bolt out of 3. Which took me half a day to take out. I then bought an impact wrench, broke through (2) 1/2 socket adaptors. I then remembered my recently bought Dremel. I cut those rusty bolts with ease. Its small enough to get into tight places. Precise enough that I wasn't worried about damaging any other parts. Had to go through 3 cutting disks but its better than spending 4 bucks on hex chuck adapters for the impact wrench. Bottom line: Dremel's look like toys but they're very reliable, easy to handle, and a great add on to weekend mechanics :)

    BalasHapus
  6. Creativity is the only limit with a rotary tool. I'd buy more burs though, as this one did not come with diamond burs. You can find them cheap here on Amazon.

    BalasHapus
  7. Bought this unit to replace one I'd had for years. This unit works better than the old in that it has noticably more power (doesn't slow down when cutting/drilling). The seperate on/off switch is nice...not having to change the speed setting to turn the unit on/off. The built in collar wrench is also very handy as it's always there with the tool.

    BalasHapus